Facebook Profile Profile

Jenna Sands

About:

Work: counselor at Valley View Ranch Equestrian Camp for Girls and Volunteer at Stride Ahead Inc.

Studies at Emory University

            Past: The Galloway School

Lives in Atlanta, GA

From Atlanta, GA

PHOTOS: 1,453

FRIENDS: 874

PLACES:

            Druid Hills, GA

            University of Georgia

MUSIC: 4

MOVIES: 12

TV SHOWS: 13

BOOKS: 5

APPS AND GAMES: 2

LIKES: 152

 

            A scroll through my Facebook timeline contains mostly pictures that friends have tagged me in, a sprinkle of profile picture changes, a handful of pictures I posted of me and my friends, and an occasional link to an article I found interesting. My photos consist of me and my friends smiling—our arms around each other’s waists or shoulders, selfies that I had jumped into the background of at the last minute, and me and my friends mid-action at youth group events or simply while spending time together. My pages were liked when I first received a Facebook in middle school and was over-enthusiastic about filling up my news feed with “I hate waking up early” and “11:11 make a wish :)” pages.

            As I have gotten older, my attachment to Facebook has shrunk. Now it’s a website that I will occasionally visit: checking a notification, seeing what time an event starts, adding pictures to an album, collaborating with a group project or organization in a Facebook group. I no longer obsessively scroll through my news feed, stalk the number of likes a status update or profile picture gets, or go on “liking-sprees” of pages whose names make me laugh. Now I view Facebook as a tool: a networking tool and a virtual resume.

            Ever since coming to Emory, I have been constantly searching for the Facebook pages of the organizations I am interested in joining. Now my news feed is filled with details about events and invitations to them. It has been one of the main mediums I have used in order to fully get involved with the Emory community, get to know the events and happenings on campus, and familiarize myself with the classmates whose names I sometimes need a refresher on.

            Prior to my arrival on Emory, during my junior year of high school, I made sure that my profile was a shining example of the type of student a university would want to accept. I un-liked my immature “homework sucks” pages, added work experiences, and posted a few more orchestra pictures. After hearing the horror stories of colleges rejecting applicants because of their social media profiles, I not only wanted my profile to be clean of rejection-worthy items, but also highlight my more appealing extracurricular activities. As I get older and start this new chapter of my life, I wonder how much more my Facebook and social media habits with evolve.

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One thought on “Facebook Profile Profile

  1. Jenna,

    It was interesting to see how similarly we both use Facebook and how over time, it became less and less important to us. I really related to the sentences you included regarding liking silly pages in middle school and needing to clean up your profile junior year when applying to colleges.

    Overall, you did a really nice job organizing this piece. The structure was strong and there was good flow between paragraphs. You were able to move forward and backward throughout time with ease, versus writing about the chronological progression of your Facebook profile. I truly admire authors who are able to do this so naturally. The one thing that confused me was the inconsistency between the sentences, “Now it’s a website that I will occasionally visit…” and “I have been constantly searching for the Facebook pages…” Though I understand the point that you were trying to get across, at first I was a little unclear. Perhaps you could have included something like, “Only on occasion will I use Facebook for social purposes. Instead, I utilize it as a tool to gather information about clubs at Emory,” as to not contradict yourself.

    Emily Enyedi

    Like

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