Soylential: A movie about super humans

In light of Lizzie Widdicombe’s article “The End of Food” about the nutritious and time efficient meal-drink Soylent, I began to ponder the many directions mass consumption of Soylent could go in and in what ways it could transform or impact humanity, how we perceive food, and we experience different things. The combination of my thoughts on Soylent and my love for sci-fi, conceived “Soylential”, a (potential) movie about a breed of near perfect superhumans.

The setting is in a postmodern world in the very mid 22nd century, where humans have suffered a slew of serious consequences such as global warming, overharvesting, deforestation, industrialization that runs into natural habitats, pollution, etc. At the zenith of what was viewed as a near apocalyptic event from the lack of sustainability and depletion of resources on Earth, a panel of cutting edge scientists and engineers are selected to find a quick solution to ensure the continuity of humanity. Rhinehart emerges with a solution – Soylent. By figuring out the basic chemicals, combinations, and building blocks of food – minerals, vitamins, macro nutrients, and micro nutrients – he is able to construct a drink capable of sustaining the human population using minimal resources. Frenzied and pressed for time, the drink is administered to the masses and proves to be wildly effective.

Fast forward to the year 2158, and an entirely different breed of human beings exist. Due to the highly nutritious nature of the drink, humans have become a hyper version of themselves. Whereas the commonly processed foods sold during the early 21st century lacked in nutrtional value, the consumption of Soylential has filled in these holes. Humans are better looking than ever before with clearer skin, stronger muscles, less illnesses, longer hair, clearer vision, and are more vibrantly colored. They can run faster and longer and think quicker than ever before. Their brains function at a higher capacity, and in just about every way their abilities have been heightened. These individuals are known as Soylentials.

However, a flaw exists within the Soylentials. Although they are pratically bionic beings, they lack sensation, especially taste. Drinking Soylent has dulled their sense of taste and overtime their desire for experience and ability to find beauty in flaw and error and emote. Soylent has created a brand of logistical humans who, as time goes, are becoming more and more void of feeling and sensation despite their outward perfection.

As America has replenished itself quicker than the other countries and is abundant in resources, its government is refusing to return back to eating real food, opting instead for the breed of superhumans to become a strong (and beautiful) militia to place it as the world power once and for all and control the other countries.

This gives rise to the Anti-Soylentials, a  large and growing coalition of normal humans who have been living sustainably on the countries resources secretly. They have discovered a chemical, Sensodine, only found in real food overlooked by Rhinehart that is responsible for creating taste and thus feelings of sensation within human beings. by disguising themselves among the Soylentials, they conspire to infiltrate the government and spike the main supply of Soylent with Sensodine, injecting emotion within the Soylentials to stir revolution. However this will be difficult, as government officials have been consuming a hyper nutritional version of Soylent that makes them much, much more powerful than the Soylentials. Who will win? Power? Or Passion?

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4 thoughts on “Soylential: A movie about super humans

  1. This sounds like a pretty cool movie! I wrote sort of a similar post about the food tasting machine, and I came up with a very similar problem of the danger of too much technology and dehumanization of artistic or creative processes. I think that the idea of the Anti-Soylentials is what would really happen if the government were to step into peoples lives like that and tell them what they can and can’t eat. Overall, I like it!

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  2. The essay can be vividly imagined and processed in the brain as a potential sci-fi blockbuster in the movies. This plot takes a very different approach to the initial thoughts and ideas presented by many others in their blog posts. This theme is a break from the very conventional success story theme of Rob Rhineheart.
    All in all it is a very new idea and it will give the next generation kids something to think about. Through this plot you have combined the New Yorker article and your thoughts in such a way that it makes way for a potential 100 million grosser movie! I loved it! See you in the movies!

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  3. I would watch this movie! The plot takes advantage of the classic divide between man and machine, except with the twist that the “machine” is food, and is a very creative take on the article. With the onset of technology, we always have to wonder how far away we are straying from our human roots, and at what point we stop being humans, and start being machines. With such a compelling premise, the message the movie presents will certainly speak to today’s audiences. The title’s pretty catchy too.

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  4. This movie seems great ! The whole idea of superhumans seem awesome! Who wouldn’t love that? Also I lie how it takes place in the future, those are my favorite types of movies. Also the government intervention is interesting, I feel that maybe there might be some sort of social commentary on her part? Further research is merited. Also, I love how there is the whole machine vs. man theme to it, even if its not traditional. Your ending is great too, really left me hanging.

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