Final Blog Post

Especially at a school like Emory, there is a great amount of diversity and with diversity comes differences among groups of people. Being able to have everyone read and watch the same thing would help bring the community together. I think that if there was one article that all Emory student should read the one I would pick would be combination of “How Code-Switching Explains the World” and “Five Reasons Why People Code-Switch”. I believe that when starting college people change the way that speak to one another and sometimes it makes others feel like those people are ‘fake’ or not genuine. I think that my reading these two articles students will have a better sense of how to communicate with one another.

I thought that both articles help explain the differences betweens students depending on their background and their family life. Both articles discuss reasons for code-switching including the difference between talking with teachers and students. That example is one of the important ideas that students should know about before starting college. For the first time people have to learn how to handle situations by themselves including with professors. A lot of students do not understand how to speak to adults respectively and I think that learning about the idea of code-switching would help college students know how to act in that situation.

The second reason that I think students should read this article is the fact that a lot of the time people code-switch in order to fit in with a certain crowd of people. College should be the time for individuals to find themselves. After reading this article I would hope that people are better able to understand that if they are just themselves they have a better chance of finding someone who they are able to get along with. I think that by allowing students to understand what their peers are thinking they will build better relationships in the future.

Other all I think that by having all Emory students read the same articles it gives them a better opportunity to share similar thought and engage in conversation about the issue. There are many positive things that come out of students engaging in conversation with one another and being able to know when they have to code-switch in order to talk about some bring meaningful versus causal gossip. Emory University would benefit by having all freshman students read “How Code-Switching Explains the World” and “Five Reasons Why People Code-Switch“, two articles that would help students learn how to talk to professors as well as their peers allowing for great conversations and ideas to be born on this campus.

The Social Network (Blog 14, Prompt 2)

This class is all about technology and how we as humans and learners use and understand it. We explored technology through touch, taste, and smell. Through all the articles we read, games we played, and movies we viewed I truly enjoyed this class. If I had to add one text, book, or film to our class syllabus I would definitely add the movie The Social Network. This movie from 2010 shows how Facebook was created. I think it would fit well into our curriculum regarding technology. Everyone in today’s day and age uses Facebook and personally a few of my posts have been regarding the social networking site. In class we talk a lot about social media and how it is used. This movie could fit in with any unit we have studied. The site has changed so much since its original creation so it fits in with anything ranging from accessibility to web/game design. The movie can be used as an introduction to the world of social media and could open further discussion about Twitter or even MySpace.

Besides being an amazing movie, The Social Network describes the process of creating a media empire. Everything from coding to advertising to money is used in this film. I feel as though the movie truly embodies the “senses” related to technology. Class discussions could range anywhere from simple to complex issues regarding the movie and the site. We could discuss how we individually use the website to how the website makes our society as a whole look. It relates to the sociability ideas discussed in relation to the video games and can also be discussed in an ethos, pathos, and logos aspect.

I believe that this film, and the idea behind/around it embodies what we are supposed to take away from this class. There are so many ways we can look at the movie as well as Facebook in general. It is not only a social media site. The way it is designed, how it is used, and how it is continuously updating and changing shows the importance of understanding technology and how people use it. Everyone uses this site differently but it was created for the common purpose of connecting friends. The drunken idea to create a website to keep Harvard students up to date on what was happening turned into a billion dollar invention. Through the short span of the movie we see how the empire was created and almost destroyed. The discussion surrounding this film and the social media world in general fits perfectly into our English class, which is why I think The Social Network should be added to our class.

Why All Emory Students Should Watch “Pillow Talk”

In English 101: Technology and the Senses, students learn to relate different forms of technology to methods of writing.  Throughout the course, the objective is to have first year students practice improving their writing skills while bringing a focus of technology and the different sensory modalities to their work.  Although writing is the main focus, reading pieces that relate to the two main topics of the course allows students to learn more about other writers’ methods of how to create quality pieces of literature.  In addition, students watch and reflect on how these films relate back to technology and the senses.

One film that the class watched is called “Pillow Talk”.  The movie is based around a telephone, and portrays how easy it is for people to “code-switch” while using it.  Code-switching is when people talk and act in different ways depending on the situation that they are in and the people they are with.  In the movie, the main character, Jan, strongly dislikes the man who shares her telephone line and constantly yells at him over the phone.  The man, Brad, speaks to Jan in a condescending voice over the phone, but when he finds out who she is in person, takes on the persona of a charming man from Texas.  Because neither of them had met the other in person, both of them code-switched when they were together because they no longer had the same relationship that they had over the phone (or so Jan thought, as Brad was well aware of who she was).

The movie “Pillow Talk” includes both of the main themes of the class: technology (the telephone) and the senses (speech/hearing).  Without the telephone, which uses speech to relay messages, the two different relationships between Brad and Jan would not exist.  Also, code-switching has become a very prominent part of life, as everyone must learn that it is not acceptable to talk to a professor in the same way that they talk to a best friend.  Brad and Jan use code-switching to transfer from one part of their personalities to another because both parts of the personalities shown in the movie do not work for both of the relationships that they have with each other.

In addition, the film itself is another aspect of technology and the senses because it shows a visual representation of the story.  As opposed to a book or an article, movies allow students to use more than just their eyes to learn about a story.  The connection between technology and the senses is very present in films because one can see pictures and listen to different characters in order to learn about what is happening, while books or articles force the reader to read just words and hear just their own voices in their heads.

Based on this reasoning, the movie “Pillow Talk” should be shown to all Emory students because it will further their abilities to observe, discuss, and reflect on the importance of technology, the senses, and the relationship between the two.  “Pillow Talk” encompasses all of these aspects that lead to quality writing skills, and that paired with how enjoyable it is to watch would benefit all students at this university.

Historical Advertising Study: The Clock

People have measured time for as long as history has been documented.  Though in the very beginning all time was relative, as time progressed, so did the way people measured it.  Eventually, the clock was invented.  Throughout the twentieth century, time became more of a crucial aspect of life that people wanted to measure.  Because of this, advertisements for different types clocks began to appear more frequently.  Clock companies made different types of advertisements to try to sell their products effectively.  To do this, the companies had to change with the times.  From 1911 to 1946, the methods that clock companies used to sell clocks changed dramatically, going from simplistic advertisements to more detailed and targeted ones.

An advertisement from 1911 features a drawing of a clock, called “Big Ben”, that takes up half of the page.  Elegant, detailed, and easy to read, the clock has a prominent position on the page, stressing the importance of its appearance and effectiveness.  In addition, dividing the space between two things, a drawing and two small paragraphs, allows a simplistic and straightforward approach to selling the object.  The advertisement is in all black and white.  This lack of color allows the audience to focus on just the words and the drawing, as opposed to any colors or details that could distract from the advertisement’s main purpose of selling the clock.  At the bottom of the page, two paragraphs begin with the slogan “Leave your call with Big Ben…”  As the paragraphs continue, they consistently refer to Big Ben as a person who will help his owner keep track of time.  The personification of Big Ben, which also appears in the object’s name itself, gives the audience a sense of comfort, as though each owner can depend on a reliable person not only to remind them to do something, but also to do so “gently”.  Even in the description of the clock, the advertisement refers to Big Ben as a person, leaving the audience feeling as though this clock is more than just an object.

An advertisement from 1919 promotes the Tiffany Never-Wind Clock.  A drawing on the left of the page shows an elegant, soft, classic clock that would appeal to many home-owners.  Underneath the drawing, the slogan “You Never Wind a Never-Wind” is written in bold font.  Next to the drawing is a detailed description of the clock, which explains how the never-wind clock is much easier to use than normal clocks.  In large letters, the clock is described as “a beautiful thing made of gold and glass”.  Underneath it, the first paragraph describes the clock’s characteristics and how easy it is to use, while the second paragraph gives a physical description of the clock.  The advertisement refers to the clock as “a beautiful ornament” and “gem”, which “cannot fail to please the most fastidious taste”.  In addition, on the very top left corner, the word “Free” in bold and capital letters attracts the audience’s attention.  The advertisement says that this clock normally costs $20.00, which is the equivalent to about $282.00 in 2014.  At such a high price, the indication that the clock could be free would be very attractive to consumers.  This advertisement plays on the combination of easy-to-use and visually appealing aspects of the clock, as it explains multiple times how this clock, while beautiful, effectively tells time without the owner doing anything.

General Electric’s 1947 advertisement promotes its Clock-Radio.  Though a different product than the other two clocks, as it functions as a radio as well, its main purpose is the same.  The advertisement features three pictures of the clock, a smiling young woman, and the title “ ‘Wake-up-to-music’ Clock-Radio”, which all take up the majority of the space on the page.  The picture of the woman, who is smiling and holding her arms up as if stretching, implies that the clock radio makes her wake up happy and will do the same to the consumer.  Underneath her, three different colored versions of the clock show in different settings.  The four pictures, along with some musical notes and the words “Rise & Shine”, give the audience many visually appealing things to look at, which could lead them to spend time looking at the advertisement in more detail.  Next to the pictures is a small paragraph that begins with the phrase “Wakes You Up Smiling — Automatically Turns on Favorite Programs — Anytime”.    Underneath, the paragraphs describe the multiple types of uses that the clock-radio has, such as waking the owner up as “gently as a falling leaf” and recording the owner’s favorite program.  According to this advertisement, the General Electric Clock-Radio will make the owners “wake up smiling”, just like the woman on the top of the page, and can appeal to many types of people because of the multiple color options.

Throughout the thirty years during which these advertisements were used, the clock companies’ methods changed in order to fit what consumers wanted.  For example, the advertisement for Big Ben is simplistic, as in the early 1900s people needed clocks primarily to tell time.  Eight years later when Tiffany’s Never-Wind clock was sold, consumers wanted more visually appealing clocks that were easy to use.  In 1947, almost thirty years later, General Electric’s Clock Radio targeted yet another audience, who wanted to get more out of a clock than just the time.  All three of these clocks seem to be intended to sell to middle or upper class consumers, although each has a more specific audience that it targets, as well. Big Ben is fairly simple, therefore targeting a broad audience.  Tiffany’s Never-Wind clock is targeted specifically to an upper-class consumer, as the original price is very high and the advertisement states that it would be good for an office or home, implying that the consumer would have a lot of money.  The Clock-Radio is aimed more towards women who stay at home, as the advertisement shows a happy woman and many colorful pictures that women would be attracted to.  The clock companies wanted to sell their products effectively, and to do so they play on the wants and needs of their consumers.

Since these advertisements were shown, many different types of clocks have been produced in order to continue to follow the advancement of time measurement.  Though some of the same methods are used today, such as the personification of objects, others, such as using a picture of a woman who stays at home all day, would not work because the society’s values have changed over time.  What is important in all advertising is that companies advertise their products in a way that forms a connection between the object and the consumer, and to do that they must play on the values of that time period.

 

“Big Ben” Advertisement. Chicago Daily Tribune. 14 May 1911. K3. ProQuest Historical Newspapers. Web. 21 Nov. 2014.

Buffalo Specialty Co. “Tiffany Never-Wind Clock”. Advertisement. 1919. Duke University Libraries. Web. 21 Nov. 2014.

General Electric Company. “GE Clock Radios”.  Advertisement.  Life Magazine. 1947. Duke University Libraries. Web. 21 Nov. 2014.

Coffee

When we think of coffee advertisements today so many different things may come to mind. We could be thinking of coffee shops such as Dunkin’ Donuts’ with their popular slogan “America Runs on Dunkin’”, or we could be thinking about instant coffee such as Folgers or Maxwell House. Regardless of what advertisements we are thinking of when we think of coffee all are targeted towards a certain group of people. Ads tend to work best when they are made for a specific population and also tend to make assumptions about their customers.

Around 1919 the idea of instant coffee became the latest phenomenon. Many companies were trying to turn their ground coffee beans into instant coffee to keep up with the technologically changing world. People no longer wanted to wait for coffee to brew so instant coffee was the quickest and easiest way to get the same great taste at a faster rate. In The Atlantic Monthly Advertiser an ad was placed for “Barrington Hall Soluble Coffee”. This advertisement featured many words in different sized print as well as a very bold picture of a coffee tin. Though in black and white, the soluble coffee is clearly highlighted due to the firework type image behind it. Next to the image the quote “Good-Bye, Old Coffee Pot!” is written and underneath it a blub about why the coffee is so good, where to purchase the coffee, how much it cost, and especially how convenient it is to make and consume. The very bottom of the ad features a cut off order slip with instructions on how to get some of this coffee. This advertisement is targeted towards coffee drinkers but does not focus on a specific gender or age group. The ad is a bit wordy for today’s time but fits very well into the time period in which it was released. Due to the fact that this idea was very new the words are needed to further explain to people what the product is. The color contrast makes the images pop and have that as the first thing that catches our eyes.

In the late 1800s Maxwell House, a popular brand of coffee, was founded. Not long after they created their brand they began releasing advertisements anywhere they could. In an advertisement in the Corpus Christi Caller in 1929 they published an ad for their coffee. At first glance we can already tell this is an ad for coffee. We see a man drinking a cup of coffee. Behind him we see other men and women doing the same. The print says “Such a little more to pay for such greater satisfaction”. Below the Companies logo it says in small print a brief advertisement for their tea. This ad appeals to both men and women, presumably in their late twenties to early forties based on the appearance of the people in the advertisement. By stating that the company also sells tea the ad is geared toward tea as well as coffee drinkers. The ad makes the assumption that people like to enjoy caffeinated beverages. It makes drinking coffee look fun and effortless. The simplistic design and black and white color of the ad makes it easy to read and understand.

Flash-forward to the 1960s, the famous instant coffee company released a series of television ads. The majority of these advertisements fit the social norms of the decade: housewives catering to every need of their husbands. This ad was geared towards women, especially those who “made bad coffee”. I viewed a series of these commercials and they all started off with the men complaining about their coffee and then the women going to either their friend, neighbor, or grocer stating how their husbands did not enjoy the beverage they were making. All of the ads featured women in dresses with their hair and makeup done up as well as pearls and high heels. Their husbands were dressed in suits and seen always sitting down at the table. In one of the commercials, a woman named Mary goes to see her neighbor Mrs. Olson with a problem, she complains how her husband described her coffee as “undrinkable as ever”. Mrs. Olson then goes over to the cabinet and pulls out a tin of Folgers. The coffee is said to be “different” and “special” because it is Mountain Grown. After the women finish talking the coffee tin is displayed and the logo comes up on the screen emphasizing the mountain grown aspect. I really enjoyed watching this ad, it seems relatable and advertises the coffee very well.

Though all coffee ads are different and advertise different types and ways to consume coffee, they all have the same purpose: to get a certain population to buy their product. Regardless of the company and target audience the goal is to get people to buy and drink coffee. Whether it be printed in a newspaper or repeated over and over on TV, the way we view coffee at first glance is shaped by how it is advertised.

Works Cited:

 Barrington Hall Soluble Coffee. Advertisement. Atlantic Monthly 123 (1919): n.

pag. Digital file.

 Folgers Coffee Commercial #13 (1960s). By I Want More Retro. YouTube. YouTube,

29 May 2009. Web. 1 Dec. 2014. <https://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=D3WeAawf_zE>.

The Corpus Christi caller. (Corpus Christi, Tex.), 21 Sept. 1921. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86071134/1921-09-21/ed-1/seq-3/>

Historical Ad

Since its creation, the iPhone has risen in popularity. People had many doubts about the iPhone when it came out. It did not become as popular as it is only by word of mouth. The iPhone was strategically advertised to become as popular as it is now. Apple’s advertisements represent what the company stands for.

The first advertisement that can be analyzed is the “Thanks a billion” ad. In this ad one sees an iPhone 3G that shows an endless amount of apps coming off the screen. This ad is thanking iPhone users for buying a billion apps. The iPhone in the ad looks as though it was made on a computer. It is not a picture of an actual iPhone. The background is flat white, but it there is a shadow underneath the iPhone, which makes the viewer think it is sitting on some type of platform. This ad makes a few assumptions about iPhone users. The first assumption is that all iPhone users contributed to the billion apps sold. This may not necessarily be true. There may be people that use the iPhone purely for a phone, to text and call. The iPhone comes preloaded with apps when one buys it. The user does not have to pay for these apps, so these apps do not contribute to the billion sold. A user may only use these apps that were pre-downloaded and never buy an app.

This ad apple made does not only advertise for the iPhone, but it advertises for each individual app shown. The apps closer to the screen start off small, and they are relatively hard to see. If one looks close enough, he may be able to tell what the app is. As the apps come out of the screen they become larger and easier to see. The larger apps are some of the most popular apps in the App Store. Some of these are the Facebook, Pandora, or Shazam apps. These companies most likely paid Apple to put their apps the largest in order to advertise their company as well. This ad was strategically made not only to advertise the iPhone but also other companies that have apps on the app store.

The next ad we will look at is the fist video ad for the iPhone. The video starts with people saying hello in old black and white movies. The movies progressed until the people saying hello are from modern films. What makes the iPhone so popular is how simple it is to use. This idea is represented in the video ad. The creators do not show people saying whole sentences; they only say one word, “hello.” The ad appeals to all audiences because it starts with very old movies and moves through time until it gets to recent movies. The “hello” comes from very popular films such as Anchorman or Meet the Fockers. The ad shows people answering the phone, which is appropriate for a phone ad, but one can also interpret “hello” as the iPhone saying “hello” to the world. What makes this ad so successful was where it was premiered. This ad was first aired at the Academy Awards, which is one of the largest events for the film industry. Each year people in the film industry come to this event to be noticed for superb performance in a certain category. Many of the people in the ad may be at the award show. This makes the ad more personal by connecting it to these celebrities that people idolize. The ad has one flaw, however. It assumes that the viewers have seen the movies. If the viewer has not seen any of the films shown in the ad, then it is not as successful.

The first two ads we analyzed are ads of the original iPhone. We can compare these ads to ads of the new iPhone. The iPhone 6 and 6+ are the newest iPhones. In order to sell these phones successfully, Apple must create ads showing what the iPhone can do and why it is better than all the other iPhones. This ad focuses on the size of the iPhone. Throughout the ad one of the voices keeps repeating how the iPhone is “huge.” He is no longer referring to the size of the iPhone; he is referring to how the iPhone is important. He is trying to get people to buy the iPhone because it is groundbreaking and revolutionary.

The ad makes a few assumptions about the people who use the iPhone. The first things you see when watching the ad are the iPhones and the hands holding them. It is obvious that the person holding the phone is a Caucasian male. His fingernails are perfectly groomed and there are no errors on his hands. This is unrealistic. Not everyone who uses the iPhone is going to be white or perfectly groomed. This seems as though the ad is not marketing to all the different types of consumers. Another thing one notices when looking at the ad is the slimness of the iPhone. One of the selling points of the iPhone 6 and 6+ is how large the screen is and how slim the body is. People do not want to carry around a thick heavy phone, so Apple has made a phone that is lighter and skinnier than others. The ad says that the phone will “change the way you see the world.” By viewing the world on your iPhone, you are not actually viewing the world at all. People are looking at a projection of the world on the screen of their phone. The ad tells the viewer “it can improve your health.” The iPhone itself cannot actually improve your health. It gives you the tool to track your health, but it does not make you healthier.

In the first iPhone video ad there are short clips showing people saying “hello” into a phone. The iPhone was saying “hello” to the world. The ad does not show many other things about the iPhone. It does one very quick spin, shows the screen, and then is no longer shown. In the newer iPhone ads, key parts of the phone are showed. In the one analyzed above it advertises how big and slim the iPhone is. The screen is large, yet the body is slim. Apple prides itself on simplicity. In each of the three ads analyzed, this is proven. In the second ad it is simply saying “hello.” In the first and third ad the iPhone is set on a completely white background, but one can tell there is a bit of depth to the setting. There is much thought that goes into selling the iPhone. The ads are strategically shown at specific times and highlight specific features to make people want the iPhone. Apple is very good at advertising, and one can see this by how popular its products have become in the past decade.

Works Cited

Apple. “Thanks a billion.” Advertisement. 2009. Ads of the World. Web. 1 Dec. 2014.

Apple. “Hello.” Advertisement. 2 Mar. 2007. Apple. Web. 1 Dec. 2014.

Apple. “Huge.” Advertisement. 2014. Apple. Web. 1 Dec. 2014.

Television AD Study

Television is likely one of the most influential inventions of the last one hundred years. The TV has also gone through major innovations, changing the way we see the world and the way content is delivered to us. Just like many inventions before it, the television had to be put in the hands of the consumer before it could actually have a meaningful impact on society. The people in charge of convincing society that they should buy television were the advertising teams and the advertising agencies.

As the television developed and evolved over time so did the advertising for television sets, content and cameras. All companies wanted to prove they were on the cutting edge of television technology and that they wanted to provide the best possible experience to their customers. For this reason the advertisements for many televisions and television related products are centered around technology. However, the ads, like ads for many other products, also use specified diction in order to appeal to our logos and our pathos.

The earliest advertisement I examined was for a General Electric Black-Daylite TV. The most obvious aspect of the ad is that it is in black and white. This was likely done because the TV is not a color set, so the images on the screen are supposed to make the consumer believe the images in the ad are as clear as they will actually be on the set. Next, the ad attempts to make the reader believe that the set is magical and amazing. The slogan is “You won’t believe it’til you see it!” and the technology is called “Ultra-Vision.” The attempt was to make the consumer think the television set was amazing and other worldly in its picture quality. The ad assumes the customer wants the best image quality and a really good price as they put a price they think is low for all to see. They also mention how a person can trade in an old set and get a “liberal” trade in value for it. The price focus reiterates that at this time in American history the TV was still seen as a luxury item.

In order for a television set to be worth having, it needs to have content. Knowing this, advertisers also made advertisements focusing on what they were broadcasting. In a 1966 advertisement created by GE, the ad told consumers that next seasons Dallas Cowboys games would be broadcasted in color. The ad is a large two page spread with a huge color picture. The picture looks clear and crisp, like any consumer would want to see. They want you to think the picture will be so good it will almost be like you were actually there. It seems like they are going after men in the ad because more men than women watch football. Also, it is assumed men are the one making bigger purchases. The ad also has a second purpose. It wants to sell theses new cameras to other channels as well. In the blurb on the side of the ad it talks about the practicality and technology of the camera. It talks about what colors it can broadcast and how the camera only weighs 155 pounds.

The next ad that I examined was a 1961 ad for RCA’s new camera technology. These new image orthicons are highly sensitive tubes designed to pick greater light so sets need less light to capture color images. The ad is designed for the television producers and not the average consumer. It is not focused on being as flashy or eye catching but on being informative. The ad has far more words then the first two. The top part of the article, with the larger text, talks about how the new technology lessens production costs. These new orthicons require less lighting, which keeps the sets cooler so you don’t need as much as air conditioning. These extra costs could have stopped people from broadcasting in color thus stopping them from creating better content for their customers. The rest of the ad is large paragraphs that are about the technological advancements of the new device.

While all the ads have differences, they all have one thing in common; they emphasize technology. With any new invention, there is always much that can be improved on. The television sets themselves can become clearer, bigger and have more colors. As technology improves so does the quality of the programs on TV and the picture on the set themselves. Consumers want the most realistic picture possible and the television makers want to entice people to get these better sets.

The television ads themselves vary based on what the objective of the ad is and the audience. Television ads focused on the consumer had more pictures, less words and the words they did have were often buzz words like resolution and sharpness. Beyond that ads intended to sway consumers possibly had prices and brand names. Ads for production equipment, on the other hand, had far more words and therefore less pictures. They would go into greater detail about what made their equipment different and how that would result in better picture quality of content. They would explain how they delivered more clear content other than just saying it was sharper.

Works Cited

General Electric. [Display Ad 21]. Advertisement. Los Angeles Times. 10 Feb. 1953.     Web. 23 Nov. 2014.

RCA. [The Most Trusted Name in Television]. Advertisement. Broadcasting. 27 Nov.   1961. Web. 23 Nov. 2014.

General Electric. [General GE Electric]. Advertisement. Broadcasting. 12 Sep. 1966.    Web. 23 Nov. 2014.

Historical Advertising Study: Television

Television technology has been evolving and the industry has been growing for decades. The advertisements have also changed to fit with the demands of the consumers. The following advertisements were published through different mediums over a decade, showing the growth of the development of the television and the various features that became the subject of concern.

The first advertisement is for Du Mont Telesets and it’s headline is ‘Get the most out of your life… with TELEVISION’. The next title is ‘Get the most out of Television… with DU MONT’, which indirectly advertises the company as the tool to get the best out of life. It was published in a newspaper, the New York Herald Tribune, in 1946, which was a decade after televisions began to be sold commercially. The advertisement is black and white, and the word TELEVISION is written in a big bold letters across the top which will instantly grab the reader’s attention. The background of the page is pictures of television programs and a living room with a television set. There are multiple pictures of dancers and sports, which indicates that those were the predominant leisure activities of that period. There is a picture of a ship, which caters to the male population. The sports attract males and the dancers attract females or couples, hence engaging both genders. The photo of the living room promotes television as a family or social activity and sends a message that it can be integrated into the reader’s lifestyle. There is also a small text box in the centre of the page highlighting the attractions of the product, using words such as “thrills”, “pleasure” and “biggest events”. The bottom of the page has the week’s television highlights under broad categories such as Sports, Drama, Variety and Comedy, which cover programs that will draw people from various backgrounds and ages in. The ad makes assumptions about the type of activities that interest the target audience and that the customers come from a high enough socio-economic background to afford this luxury. The visual imagery is powerful and the most eye-catching words/phrases proclaim the potential effect of the product on the customers. Since it is in a newspaper, it reaches a target audience of a wide range but assumes that educated people want to buy a television.

The second advertisement was published in 1952 in a magazine called Better Homes and Gardens. Since it is published in a magazine which advertises ways to ‘better’ consumers’ homes, it indicates that a television can improve a home. A home and improvement magazine would probably be bought by a woman. The title is ‘The “sandman” was forgotten… the picture stayed clear and steady’. The sandman was a mythical character who brings good dreams by sprinkling magical sand onto eyes of people as they sleep. It was predominant in European folklore, indicating that the target audience was Europeans. There is a large photo of a family watching a tv which is wrapped like a present with a bow with a christmas tree. The mother, father, son and daughter are all smiling and appear to be enjoying the program. This highlights that the television can provide entertainment for all ages and genders. The mother and father are dressed well and the price and range of television models indicates that it could be bought by consumers from a range of socioeconomic backgrounds with a variety of needs. Since the family is having fun together, it markets family life. Christmas is associated with grand gifts and merriment, making this television present even more wonderful. The seal of the company is largely printed in the middle of the ad. The ad says that ‘your dealer’ is ‘waiting for your call’, making it personalized. Words such as “restrained simplicity”, “owners proudly recommend” and “friendly charm” make it more enticing and polished. The ad focuses on the quality of the pictures remaining clear for a long period of time, which could have been the main problem faced by consumers.

The third advertisement was published in 1956 on a billboard. This targets people who drive, which could range from any socioeconomic background. This ad emphasizes clarity and has a picture of a cat reacting to a picture of a dog on the television, showing that it has life like clarity. This ad only says “You can see it BETTER on a CROSLEY TV” because it is meant for people who are moving fast and hence do not have time to read a long description. It is meant ot have maximum amount of impact with the smallest number of words. This ad does not target younger consumers who cannot drive yet, but could be strategically placed around shops to attract people who do not drive.

Both, the newspaper and magazine advertisements, promoted togetherness either socially or as a family and showed that the television could be integrated into daily life. The focus of the three ads was different; the first one emphasized life improvement through a television set, the second one pointed out longevity and the third one stressed on image clarity. This follows the trend of technological advancements. At first the television needed to be introduced to the market, after which problems such as the deterioration of pictures needed to be addressed and finally the clarity was refined and is still evolving with new technology such as Blu Ray and HD being released.

Citations:

Allen B. DuMont Laboratories, Inc. “Get the most out of life… with Television”. Advertisement. New York Herald Tribune. 1946. Duke Digital Collections. Web 1 Dec. 2014.

http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/adaccess_TV0483/

Sentinel Radio Corporation. “The “sandman” was forgotten… the picture stayed clear and steady!”. Advertisement. Better Homes and Gardens. 1952. Duke Digital Collections. Web 1 Dec. 2014.

http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/adaccess_TV0325/

Crosely. “You can see it Better on a Crosley TV”. Advertisement. 1956. Duke Digital Collections. Web 1 Dec. 2014.

http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/oaaaarchives_BBB5336/

Effective Advertising: A Look at the Success and Failure Attempts of Solar Energy Companies

Effective advertising targets a specific audience and frames a provided good or service in a positive light; ideally, advertisements attract consumers that would otherwise not consider the product. Solar energy, a modern-day replacement for harmful traditional energy sources, has many benefits that most consumers fail to recognize. Commercials and other advertising techniques target middle-aged, wealthy home owners in an attempt to embed this relatively unknown phenomenon in a society that seems to resist change. Solar energy, though a large initial investment that may repel lower and lower-middle class citizens, will pay off in the long run as solar panels have a twenty year horizon to receive a return on investment. Typical Americans do not think about energy beyond paying the bills. We flick on a switch and expect power without giving the source a second thought. Solar energy cannot help but change this mindset. The panels gleaming from residential rooftops demand attention. All things considered, solar energy attracts a progressive audience because implementation requires a transition from typical, traditional energy that conformist citizens will not want to transfer from. Only through deliberate advertising will the unbacked stigma concerning solar energy be erased resulting in widespread popularity that will inevitably lead consumers away from traditional energy sources.

In an attempt to convert traditional energy users, the solar company, Sunrun, created a brief cartoon advertisement with talking kitchen appliances, but it appears they have misjudged their target audience. Although the ad is creative and unique, thus naturally retaining attention, the cartoon seems very childish and would not attract the middle-aged, upper class audience that solar energy pertains to. The novelty of the ad discredits the sophistication of the company and its product. Though the commercial may convince viewers to research solar energy, why should consumers trust Sunrun? With that being said, solar energy is a relatively difficult issue to comprehend because of its infrequency in comparison to traditional sources of energy. The ad is simple to digest and speaks to an audience that does not know much about solar energy. It sparks interest by declaring that solar panel implementation will decrease monthly energy expenditures. Similarly, the talking appliances draw attention to just how much energy we use on a daily basis. With a need for so much energy to fuel our daily activities, we need a cheap, efficient source of energy. The increasing price of traditional energy will veer economically minded persons towards solar panels. The feel of this modernized cartoon speaks to the forward thinking associated with environmentally conscious energy sources, and the puns throughout create the sense that reliance on solar energy results in a carefree lifestyle. The slogan “Switching to solar isn’t just smart. It’s brilliant.” alludes to the sun while evoking a sense of pathos by telling their audience that switching to solar is the right thing to do.

In contrast, the German energy company, Solon Corporation, released a video ad in 2007 showing batteries raining down from the sky and destroying the city. A fact flashes across the screen: “970 trillion kWh of energy fall from the skies every day” and then the chaos ceases. This commercial is powerful in that as the batteries fall and destroy the city, we see how destructive traditional energy sources are, yet when we rely on solar energy, the chaos stops. Immediately, the color scheme of the video changes from a dark, brown tint to the blues and greens of a solar panel filled grassy field on a sunny day. Traditionally, the metal of solar panels would seem to ruin the beautiful grassy landscape, but in contrast to the darkness and destruction of the city, it invokes a sense of desire. The commercial demands your attention, but at the end, Solon misses the opportunity to seal the deal of a very captivated audience. The end of their video refers to solar energy by saying, “Good we can’t see it […] Bad we don’t use it.” This pedestrian vocabulary and poorly constructed statement makes the company lose credibility and potential customers, so even though consumers may be attracted to the idea of solar energy from this commercial, they will be deterred from doing business with Solon based on this oversight.

Later that year, Solon Corporation released an ad with people walking around a rooftop covered in solar panels. Plastered on the photo is their newly patented slogan, “Don’t leave the planet to the stupid.” This slogan invokes dozens of negative connotations, and potentially offends a number of different individuals. It remains unclear who Solon intends to insult. Are they saying that policy makers are stupid, so they should not be trusted to change laws to promote unconventional energy sources? Are they saying that other energy companies are stupid, so when buying solar panels, you should choose Solon? Are they calling the general public is stupid, therefore you need to contract out to Solon for an energy resource? It is ambiguous, but depending on which stance you take, a variety of audiences could be offended. So why did Solon think this was a brilliant slogan? It appears that they are trying to invoke a sense of trust from consumers. They are attempting to get consumers to trust them with their energy needs instead of others, thus calling themselves smart and reliable. Ironically, this is the same company that used poor grammar in their previous commercial ad. Nevertheless, Solon’s ad captivates. Anyone who comes across this advertisement cannot help but do a double take. Did they really just say that? A huge part of the battle with advertising is catching the attention of prospective consumers, so for better or for worse, this slogan cannot be ignored. Moving beyond the slogan, the photo promotes a sense of comfort. The people walking amongst the solar panels reassure consumers that there are people behind the face of the technology in order to support the transition. It removes some of the mystery behind such an advanced and uncustomary technology. One possibly fatal assumption that the company is making is that everyone knows what solar energy panels look like. Within their ad, there is no mention of what the company does or what they are advertising. Solon misses the opportunity to appeal to a larger mass of people by choosing not to include information about solar energy.

Due to the hassle associated with changing energy sources and the upfront investment necessary to implement the technology, solar energy must speak to a progressive audience. Environmentally conscious individuals may be interested, but interest is not always enough for a commitment. The Sunrun video advertisement speaks to the wallets of consumers, claiming that solar panels will decrease your monthly energy expenditures. The Solon video advertises to the environmentally conscious while their graphically designed advertisement utilizes the technique of being bold to attract attention. Universally, each of these ads fail to outline the necessity of solar energy. Fear is a powerful motivator because it promotes a sense of urgency. With technology like unconventional energy sources, the desire to switch is diminished because the ominousness of depleting traditional energy sources seems so far off. However, if these ads were to outline the effect of global warming on the strength of storms like Hurricane Katrina, suddenly, the hassle to switch from existing energy sources to solar energy seems trivial. Furthermore, widespread distribution of an ad is crucial to gaining awareness, yet all of the aforementioned ads fail to do so. Whether or not they are successful in attracting an audience, their lack of prominence and detectability contributes to a weak impact concerning the future of energy resources and global sustainability.

Works Cited

Solon. “Don’t Leave the Planet to the Stupid.” 11 Dec. 2007: Web. 23 Nov. 2014.

<http://cdn5.triplepundit.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/solon-stupid.jpg>

Solon. [Solon Commercial]. 7 Mar. 2007: Web. 23 Nov. 2014 <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P281f14R0-I>

Sunrun. “Run Your Kitchen on the Sun.” Vimeo 17 July 2014: Web. 24 Nov. 2014.

<http://vimeo.com/101004161>

Coca Cola Historical Ad Campaign

When I was trying to decide on a specific item to research I was in the Coca-Cola Museum with my roommate and she had the great idea that I should write my paper about coca-cola. It also helped that as I started my research I was coming across all these names I already knew due to the fact that they were names on the buildings at Emory University. As I researched Coca-Cola I began to come across a common theme of happiness and feeling good because of drinking this new soft drink. After looking through many advertisements for Coca-Cola starting around the 1900s, I was able to find a common theme in those as well, and as one would expect it was also happiness and feeling good.

The first advertisement, a printed article, has a slogan of The Pause for People-on-the-Go trying to cater to what people back then were already starting to be on the go. When someone sees this advertisement it looks as though it is directed to the middle age man or woman who is busy with work and may have needed a pick me up on the middle of the work day. Seeing the happy face of the man on the picture makes the person looking at the picture feel just as happy and want to buy the product. The picture also shows that this product is most likely something that people of all classes are able to enjoy. There would have been a positive connotation when looking at the advertisement as people want to have something that tastes good in a short amount of time meaning that they are able to get all of the other important things finished in their lives that were going on in the 1900s.

The second advertisement, I found on YouTube from the 1920s, and has a story line of these two men, one of whom stole the girl and the other one saw it happen and is trying to get her back. At the end, the man who is trying to save her succeeds and as they share a kiss a text appears on the screen saying Coca Cola Be the Hero. Just like a mini episode of a television show, the hero represents saving someone in order to make them happier and he is able to do that with the help of a Coca-Cola product. When watching this video, most likely made for someone who is watching a television show that probably had mysteries involved, the viewer is intrigued and going to watch the entire video before realizing that all of this was to advertise Coca-Cola which makes them suddenly want to buy the product when they see it on the screen. This advertisement would have been a successful way for Coca-Cola to sell there product as people are always supportive of the hero.

The last advertisement is other printed article containing the slogan, The Taste-Good Feeling, this advertisement continues to follow the theme of finding happiness while drinking the bottle. The happiness of the man in the picture is represented by the smile as the bottle touches his lips and his close eyes as he takes in the delicious taste of the soft drink. The article also uses one of their original slogans, Delicious and Refreshing, and the image allows the viewers to see that that is exactly how the man feels when drinking his Coca-Cola. This advertisement was probably seen by the general public as people of all ages were enjoying this soft drink daily. In the end, this advertisement would have been a success as people want to enjoy that good feeling just from drinking a soft drink.

Through all of the advertisements that I found when doing my research I believed that these three best represented the type of audience as age that Coca-Cola was targeting. For the most part, all ages, genders, and social classes were drinking Coca-Cola even when it was first being made. As well as for the time, all of the visuals are very easy to read and understand for a common person. I think that seeing these advertisements has helped me decide how I best can advertise the same product over a hundred years later using their same tactic; show people happiness.

 

http://file.vintageadbrowser.com/l-ev3s6h8dnse9c7.jpg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hE4KszOCsWI

http://file.vintageadbrowser.com/q0ts7s3ajdup1k.jpg